Torre Troyana, Asti | Info and Contacts on Artsupp
Torre Troyana
Logo : Torre Troyana

Torre Troyana

Asti, Italy

Cover
Logo

Torre Troyana

Asti, Italy

Torre Troyana

In Piazza Medici stands the Troyana Tower, also known as the Clock Tower, with a square plan, 44 meters high; climbing the 199 steps of the wooden staircase present in its entirety, it is possible to reach the top and enjoy a wonderful view of the entire city.
The tower, belonging to the Troya family palace, was built in the 13th century in a nerve center for the medieval city. The strategically very significant position underlines the prominent role that the family occupied in the social fabric of the city; news about the Troyas is scarce, but I allow you to follow the rise and subsequent decline of this influential family. The family could boast a thriving monetary loan business in various areas of Europe (Germany, France, Belgium) and the construction of a palace and a high tower is part of the policy aimed at showing the wealth accumulated by the members of this family; a prestige also testified by the city chronicles that recall the prohibition, broken by the Troyas, to erect towers higher than that owned by the Bertramenghi Scarampi families (about 36 meters high). Related to this first phase of construction are the single-lancet windows that open in the lower part of the building, architecturally very different from the mullioned windows that adorn the highest part of the tower and date back to subsequent interventions, dictated not only by aesthetic needs. In the early years of the fourteenth century, in fact, the Troyas are involved, like almost all the Asti families, in the fierce struggle that sees two opposing factions clash, that of the De Castello and that of the Solaro, allies of the Troya. The latter are expelled from the city and deprived of all properties within the walls; after an exile that lasted just over a year, the family will regain possession of the building and will begin some renovation works on the building. In addition to a drastic planimetric modification of the building, the twelve mullioned windows with round arches distributed over three floors and the terminal strip consisting of three rows of arches made of alternating terracotta and sandstone, typical of the Asti area, date back to this phase.
The tower and the palace, owned by the Troyas until the extinction of the family in the fifteenth century, passed in 1560 to Emanuele Filiberto, Duke of Savoy, who assigned the tower to the public function of striking the hours. The bell on the top, completely restored and relocated to its original position, dates back to 1531 and is one of the oldest in all of Piedmont.
From November 1st to March 31st, the tower remains closed for safety reasons as the cold and frost make the steps impassable.
From 1 April, the tower can be visited again to give visitors a "breathtaking" view.

Torre Troyana - 1
Torre Troyana - 2
Torre Troyana - 3

Contact

Fondazione Asti Musei
Torre Troyana

Piazza S. Secondo, 1
14100, Asti

Opening hours

    The Tower is temporary closed from the november 1st to march 31st 

Palazzo Mazzetti

Asti

Cripta e Museo di Sant'Anastasio

Asti

Palazzo Alfieri

Asti

Domus Romana

Asti