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MANDA - Museo Archeologico Nazionale d’Abruzzo - Villa Frigerj verified

Chieti, Abruzzo, IT closed Visit museumarrow_right_alt

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The Capestrano Warrior
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Hercules Curino
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Heracles Epitrapezios
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Stole statue of Foruli
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Statue of a discophore with head portrait by Foruli
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Statue of a military figure from Foruli
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Zeus
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Portrait from Alba Fucens
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Portrait of a Man from Alba Fucens
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Standing mummiform Osiris
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Three-disk armor
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Bronze fibula
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Sandals of Campovalano
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Cooking pan
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Olla
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Ring
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Tablets patron gods Amiternum
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Bronze altar
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Antefissa (n. 2)
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Antefissa (n. 1)
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Face
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Untitled
The Capestrano Warrior
Hercules Curino
Heracles Epitrapezios
Stole statue of Foruli
Statue of a discophore with head portrait by Foruli
Statue of a military figure from Foruli
Zeus
Portrait from Alba Fucens
Portrait of a Man from Alba Fucens
Standing mummiform Osiris
Three-disk armor
Bronze fibula
Sandals of Campovalano
Cooking pan
Olla
Ring
Tablets patron gods Amiternum
Bronze altar
Antefissa (n. 2)
Antefissa (n. 1)
Face
Untitled

Other works on display

Description

This bronze statuette depicts the Egyptian god Osiris, lord of the underworld, standing as a human mummy. The anatomical elements are only slightly outlined, to give the effect of the wrapping shroud. Osiris wears the atef crown – a tall headdress with one curling ostrich feathers on each side, decorated with oblique incised lines – on which there is the uraeus (cobra snake), symbol of royalty and divinity. The stylized ostrich feathers represent justice and equity because Osiris is the Supreme Judge, among other attributes.
The face is not well preserved and not all the details are discernible, but it is possible to identify the curved false-beard, a symbol of divinity. The arms are bent across the chest and the god is holding the crook heqa and the flail nekhekh. The hands are placed one below the other, and this clue allows us to identify the provenance of the statuette as Lower Egypt. In fact, the hands’ placement on the chest usually indicates the origin place of statuettes: overlapping fists indicate that a statuette is from Upper Egypt, contrasting fists from Middle Egypt, and fists one below the other from Lower Egypt.
The back of the statuette is plain. Under the feet there is a small tenon, originally used to hold the statuette upright.

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