Share

Museo Universitario di Scienze della terra verified

Roma, Lazio, IT closed Visit museumarrow_right_alt

fullscreen
Beryl
fullscreen
Sodalite
fullscreen
Zolfus
fullscreen
Imperial Topaz Crystal
fullscreen
Sicilian Amber
fullscreen
The Aigle, a chondrite type meteorite
fullscreen
Garnets
fullscreen
Renazzo, chondrite type meteorite
fullscreen
Monte Milone, chondrite type meteorite L
fullscreen
Diamond
fullscreen
Axinite
fullscreen
Magnesite
fullscreen
Dactyliotheca
Beryl
Sodalite
Zolfus
Imperial Topaz Crystal
Sicilian Amber
The Aigle, a chondrite type meteorite
Garnets
Renazzo, chondrite type meteorite
Monte Milone, chondrite type meteorite L
Diamond
Axinite
Magnesite
Dactyliotheca

Other works on display

Description

The meteorite collection of the Museum of Mineralogy, built over more than 200 years of acquisitions and donations, is one of the most important internationally. Among the pieces of greatest historical importance, this 52 g meteorite stands out, which fell at 1 pm on April 26, 1803 in L’Aigle (Orne, France), acquired by the Museum in 1852. The exceptional nature of the L'Aigle meteorite is due to the fact that it is considered a watershed in the history of meteorites: before this fall there were the most disparate theories on the origin of meteorites (products deriving from distant volcanic eruptions, transported desert rocks from the wind etc.); was the scholar E. Chladni, considered the founding father of meteoritics who, observing the fall of L'Aigle, formulated the correct theory that meteorites came from extraterrestrial bodies, mainly based on the statements of many witnesses who observed "a shower of stones thrown by a meteor". The fragments of this meteorite, an ordinary type L6 chondrite, all belong to historical collections or important private collections; It is practically impossible nowadays to meet someone willing to deprive themselves of it, both with changes and with sales, so there are very few institutions that can boast the possession of a meteorite of such importance and the honor of being able to exhibit it for the benefit of visitors. For meteorite enthusiasts observing a fragment of L’Aigle live is like being in front of Leonardo Da Vinci's Mona Lisa.


Other artworks in Roma

You don't know about Artsupp yet?

Artsupp is the new museum portal that was born to bring together all the highlights from the world of art and Italian museums on a single platform.

About us
spinner-caricamento