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Museo Universitario di Scienze della terra verified

Roma, Lazio, IT closed Visit museumarrow_right_alt

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Beryl
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Sodalite
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Zolfus
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Imperial Topaz Crystal
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Sicilian Amber
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The Aigle, a chondrite type meteorite
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Garnets
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Renazzo, chondrite type meteorite
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Monte Milone, chondrite type meteorite L
fullscreen
Diamond
fullscreen
Axinite
fullscreen
Magnesite
fullscreen
Dactyliotheca
Beryl
Sodalite
Zolfus
Imperial Topaz Crystal
Sicilian Amber
The Aigle, a chondrite type meteorite
Garnets
Renazzo, chondrite type meteorite
Monte Milone, chondrite type meteorite L
Diamond
Axinite
Magnesite
Dactyliotheca

Other works on display

Description

This splendid example of Sicilian amber (also called simetite or more improperly succinite) is one of the points of pride of the Spada collection and more generally of the Museum of Mineralogy. Sicilian amber combines a high aesthetic and gemological value - for the transparency and richness of the colors - with an exceptional historical importance, to the point of making it one of the most appreciated and desired gems. The most abundant finds of this variety of amber occurred in a time interval between the first half of 1600 and the beginning of 1970. The simethite deposits have never been located, in fact, starting from the primary deposits located inland Sicilian, amber was removed during intense rain events that caused landslides and instability; on these occasions the erosive action of the water detached pieces of different sizes from their natural location and dispersed them in the nearby countryside or in waterways and from these to the sea where they were found beached around Catania and on the southern coast of Sicily. The reason why we no longer have news about the discovery of amber samples after the 70s is still unknown, but it could be attributed to the anthropic impact on the territory that has changed the talweg of the waterways that regulated the transport of this material, due to the construction of dams and dams. In conclusion, today amber Sicilian is no longer extracted and a sample like this, which entered in 1852 to enrich the collection of the current Museum of Mineralogy, represents an important testimony of Italian mineralogy and gemology.


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