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Museo delle Arti Decorative verified

Milano, Lombardia, IT closed Visit museumarrow_right_alt

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Bartolomeo Suardi, detto Bramantino - Tapestry Representing December
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Bartolomeo Suardi, detto Bramantino - Tapestry Representing January
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Bartolomeo Suardi, detto Bramantino - Tapestry Representing February
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 Galileo Galilei’s Geometric and military compass
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Jesus Crucified between the two thieves
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Gonzaga platter on stand
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Gio Ponti; Libero Andreotti - Blue Urn
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Otto Imperator
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Reliquary of Saints Cyprian and Justina
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Jug
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Monstrance of Voghera
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Scipione Delfinone; Camillo da Posterla - The Standard of Milan
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Marys at the Sepulchre
Bartolomeo Suardi, detto Bramantino - Tapestry Representing December
Bartolomeo Suardi, detto Bramantino - Tapestry Representing January
Bartolomeo Suardi, detto Bramantino - Tapestry Representing February
 Galileo Galilei’s Geometric and military compass
Jesus Crucified between the two thieves
Gonzaga platter on stand
Gio Ponti; Libero Andreotti - Blue Urn
Otto Imperator
Reliquary of Saints Cyprian and Justina
Jug
Monstrance of Voghera
Scipione Delfinone; Camillo da Posterla - The Standard of Milan
Marys at the Sepulchre

Other works on display

Description

The bas-relief tablet is among the finest examples of late Roman ivories. It is a justly famous piece because it is one of the first ivory diptychs with religious content and one of the earliest known representations of the Holy Sepulchre, which appears below the images of two Evangelists: Luke, symbolised by a bull, and Mathew, by an angel. In the scene below, the women, united in mourning for the dead Saviour, encounter a character, who represents an angel or the risen Christ. The presence of only two evangelists suggests the existence of a second piece, now lost. The doors of the building behind the women are decorated with three scenes from the Gospels, the Resurrection of Lazarus, Zacchaeus climbing the tree to see Jesus and Christ teaching the crowd. The attribution of such an early date, the 5th century AD, stems from stylistic considerations. The refined workmanship, the late Roman culture of the sculptor, and the extraordinary softness of carving, places the origin of the piece in one of the capitals of the Western Empire, probably Rome. Once belonging to the Trivulzio Collection, the piece was purchased in 1935 by the City of Milan.

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