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Museo Universitario di Scienze della terra verified

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Beryl
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Sodalite
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Zolfus
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Imperial Topaz Crystal
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Sicilian Amber
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The Aigle, a chondrite type meteorite
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Garnets
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Renazzo, chondrite type meteorite
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Monte Milone, chondrite type meteorite L
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Diamond
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Axinite
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Magnesite
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Dactyliotheca
Beryl
Sodalite
Zolfus
Imperial Topaz Crystal
Sicilian Amber
The Aigle, a chondrite type meteorite
Garnets
Renazzo, chondrite type meteorite
Monte Milone, chondrite type meteorite L
Diamond
Axinite
Magnesite
Dactyliotheca

Other works on display

Description

A pride of the meteorite collection of the Museum of Mineralogy is undoubtedly this 38.1 g fragment of the Renazzo meteorite. At 8.30 pm on January 15, 1824 fragments of a meteorite, weighing about 10 kg, fell near the town of Renazzo, in the province of Ferrara. It is said that this meteorite broke into 3-4 main fragments, because a woman at the time of the fall said she heard a triple noise. The people of Renazzo were frightened by noises, such as cannon shots, and wondered where they could come from since the sky was clear that evening. A few years later some specimens of this meteorite were donated, within the Spada collection, to the Museum of Mineralogy which still preserves them and exhibits them to the public. The importance of this fall is that this meteorite, at the time it was discovered, represented a unicum in the meteorite panorama, to the point that it became the progenitor of a group of carbonaceous meteorites (discovered later) called precisely CR (the R sta for Renazzo). Renazzo is therefore one of the meteorites of greatest historical and significant importance for meteoritics. Due to its importance it is one of the most desired meteorites by collectors and enthusiasts which, given the rarity and inalienability of many collections, is often destined to remain an object of desire and to be observed only in publicly accessible collections. Given its uniqueness, the Renazzo meteorite has received various international "awards": in 1962 Mason and Wiik publish the historic article "The Renazzo Meteorite" - where they detect the uniqueness of the Italian meteorite - in the American Museum Novitates of the Mineralogy Department of the American Museum of Natural History in New York; in 1964 the article "Rare Gases in the Chondrite Renazzo" by Reynolds and Turner, of the University of California, appears; in 2000 the article 'Star dust' by Russell and Alexander was published in the prestigious New Scientist periodical, indirectly dedicated to Renazzo, where he talks about "Diamonds forged inside long-extinct stars (red giants) that are providing us with important information on our origins", in particular an unusual abundance of diamonds is discovered in Renazzo, identified so far with the same high values ​​only in the meteorite Leoville.


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