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Giovanni Bellini - Trasfiguration of  Christ
fullscreen
Michelangelo Merisi, detto Caravaggio - Flagellation of Christ
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Artemisia Gentileschi - Judith and Holofernes
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Andy Warhol - Vesuvius
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Pieter Brueghel, detto il Vecchio - The Blind Leading the Blind
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Guido Reni - Atalanta and Hippomenes
fullscreen
Sandro Botticelli - Madonna with Child and Angels
fullscreen
Nativity of the Crèche
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Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola, detto Parmigianino - Portrait of a Young Woman also known as Antea
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Francesco Guarino - Saint Agatha
fullscreen
Jacopo de Barbari - Portay of Luca Pacioli
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Annibale Carracci - Choice of Hercules
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Jusepe de Ribera - Apollo and Marsyas
fullscreen
Tiziano Vecellio, detto Tiziano - Portray of Pope Paul III with His Nephews
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Tiziano Vecellio, detto Tiziano - Danae
fullscreen
Colantonio del Fiore - San Girolamo in his studio
fullscreen
Edoardo Dalbono - From Frisio to Santa Lucia or Neapolitan song
Giovanni Bellini - Trasfiguration of  Christ
Michelangelo Merisi, detto Caravaggio - Flagellation of Christ
Artemisia Gentileschi - Judith and Holofernes
Andy Warhol - Vesuvius
Pieter Brueghel, detto il Vecchio - The Blind Leading the Blind
Guido Reni - Atalanta and Hippomenes
Sandro Botticelli - Madonna with Child and Angels
Nativity of the Crèche
Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola, detto Parmigianino - Portrait of a Young Woman also known as Antea
Francesco Guarino - Saint Agatha
Jacopo de Barbari - Portay of Luca Pacioli
Annibale Carracci - Choice of Hercules
Jusepe de Ribera - Apollo and Marsyas
Tiziano Vecellio, detto Tiziano - Portray of Pope Paul III with His Nephews
Tiziano Vecellio, detto Tiziano - Danae
Colantonio del Fiore - San Girolamo in his studio
Edoardo Dalbono - From Frisio to Santa Lucia or Neapolitan song

Other works on display

Description

The painting depicts Giuditta in the act of cutting off the head of the Assyrian general Holofernes who was besieging the city of Betula. The Jewish heroine, assisted by the slave Abra, who actively participates in the beheading, embodies chastity and moral strength. Compared to most of the painters of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, who choose for the representation of this biblical episode the moment of the escape of the two women from the enemy camp after the assassination, or Judith who shows Holofernes' head triumphantly, Gentileschi chose the the most dramatic moment, namely that of the beheading, taking its cue from the famous canvas with the same subject by Caravaggio now in Palazzo Barberini. The painting was also related to the trauma suffered by the painter, who in 1611 had been raped by her colleague, Agostino Tassi. It is a youthful work, executed in Rome between 1612 and 1613, as evidenced by the strong naturalistic imprint that is accompanied by some uncertainties in the composition and anatomy. The version preserved in the Uffizi is believed by experts after this. The rigid position of Giuditta's arm finds a direct reference in the homonymous painting by Caravaggio, while the figure of Holofernes denotes the knowledge of the work with a similar subject by Rubens, as well as that depicting David and Goliath of his father, Orazio Gentileschi. We know some copies of the painting and a smaller version on a blackboard preserved in the Archbishop's Palace in Milan.

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